Monday, 27 July 2015

Five Imp Verdicts On Allowability Of FX Derivatives Loss, Taxability Of Unclaimed Bogus Liabilities Etc


M/s. Majestic Exports vs. JCIT (ITAT Chennai)

Loss suffered on account of forex derivative contracts (Exotic Cross Currency Option Contracts) cannot be treated as speculative loss to the extent that the derivative transactions are not more than the total export turnover of the assessee. If the derivative transaction is in excess of export turnover, the loss in respect of that portion of excess transactions has to be considered as speculative loss because the excess derivative transaction has no proximity with export turnover
We make it clear that total transaction considered for determining this business loss from derivative transactions cannot be more than the total export turnover of the assessee for the assessment year under consideration and if the derivative transaction is in excess of export turnover, then that loss suffered in respect of that portion of excess transactions to be considered as speculative loss only as that excess derivative transaction has no proximity with export turnover and the Assessing Officer is directed to compute accordingly
 

Perfect Paradise Emporium Pvt. Ltd vs. ITO (ITAT Delhi)

S. 41(1)/ 68: Unclaimed liabilities to creditors, even if fictitious and bogus, cannot be assessed u/s 41(1) in the absence of a write-back. The bogus credits can be assessed u/s 68 only in the year the credits were made and not in the year they are found to be not payable
Applying the ratio in the cases mentioned supra, the amount in question cannot be brought to tax in the year under appeal under the provisions of Section 41(1) of the Act. It is trite law that an addition under Section 68 can be made only in the year in which credit was made to the account of the creditors in the books of account maintained. Admittedly, in this case the credit to the account of creditors was made in the earlier years and therefore, the amount even cannot be brought to tax under Section 68 in the year under appeal. However, it is open to the Department to levy tax on such amount by resorting to the remedies available under the provisions of Act by duly following the procedure known to the law
 

Outotec India Pvt. Ltd vs. ACIT (ITAT Delhi)

Articles 13 & 15 of DTAA: Law on whether if a sum cannot be assessed as "fees for technical services" under the "make available" clause of Article 13, it can still be assessed as "Independent personal services" under Article 15 explained
The assessee’s contention that since the services contracted for the by the assessee with non-residents fall within the meaning of Article 13 but get excluded because of not `making available’ any technical knowledge etc., then such services cannot be once again considered under Article 15 is not acceptable. The precise question is that which of the two Articles, namely, 13 or 15, should have primacy in the facts and circumstances as are instantly prevailing?
 

Cheil India Pvt. Ltd vs. ITO (ITAT Delhi)

S. 40(a)(ia): In an appeal against an order passed by the AO to give effect to the ITAT's order, the CIT(A) has no jurisdiction to enhance the assessee with respect to a new source of income or disallowance of expenditure
The direction to the Assessing Officer by the CIT(Appeals) to disallow payments made by the assessee under sec. 40(a)(ia) of the Act was a question of taxability of income from a new source of income which has not been considered by the Assessing Officer, hence it was exceeding of jurisdiction by the CIT(Appeals) in a set aside matter by the ITAT in the present case. Though the CIT(Appeals) has co-terminus powers as of the Assessing Officer and is empowered to do what an Assessing Officer can do for the assessment, the directed disallowance was new source of income, which was not the subject matter of setting aside order by the ITAT
 

CIT vs. Bharat Hotels (Delhi High Court)

S. 32: A licensee who is in full control of the building and can exercise the rights of the owner in his own right is entitled to depreciation
The very concept of depreciation suggests that the tax benefit on account of depreciation legitimately belongs to one who has invested in the capital asset, is utilizing the capital asset and thereby loosing gradually investment caused by wear and tear, and would need to replace the same by having lost its value fully over a period of time

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